United Kingdom

International regulations - Navigating the minefield 

Whilst many international businesses are accustomed to dealing with different cultures, legal frameworks and business traditions, the diversity of legislation, regulation and laws across borders, and the considerable differences in their interpretation and application, could mean companies that comply in one jurisdiction may well fall foul of regulations in another. In addition to complying with the tax and legal landscape, there are also many benefits UK companies can exploit through these frameworks that may not necessarily be clear.

 

When developing your international strategy a thorough understanding of the tax and legal frameworks in that respective region is crucial.

 

Read further insights from our KPMG experts below.

 

Brent McDaniel

Brent McDaniel

UK Head of Reputational Risk

KPMG in the UK

 

International markets continue to offer exciting opportunities, but also daunting challenges. They provide fewer sources of public information about people and businesses, while at the same time possess a wide range of regulations and cultural business norms which multi-nationals must navigate. It follows that they are also perceived by many to have higher levels of bribery and corruption.

 

It comes as no surprise when some companies struggle to negotiate balancing the need to generate profits while adhering to not only the law of the country concerned but also to other relevant laws, now including the UK’s new Bribery Act. KPMG has drawn upon the experiences of a wide network of member firms overseas, with the aim of providing a balanced commentary on local reforms and attitudinal changes, without whitewashing national issues. KPMG’s commentary considers how businesses are managing risks in these sometimes challenging settings.

 

Read the full article (PDF 55 KB)

 

Mario Petriccione

Director, Corporate Tax

KPMG in the UK

 

Entering a high growth market is always challenging. Dealing with the commercial challenges is likely to take up a significant amount of management time.  It is worthwhile considering tax and legal structuring issues at the outset and starting off with the right structure. In many cases, once an operation has been set up in a sub-optimal way, it will be difficult and/or costly to move to the preferred structure at a later stage.

 

Read the full article (PDF 47 KB) 


Robin Walduck

Robin Walduck

Partner

KPMG in the UK

 

New regulations enable companies based in the UK to make substantial tax savings on income from loans to foreign subsidiaries.

 

Many international groups have traditionally set up complex funding arrangements to finance overseas subsidiaries in a cost-effective manner. Those funding arrangements have often used tax planning techniques to minimise the tax they pay on the returns they generate on the financing. Not only is this often very complex and costly; there is also the ever-present risk of challenge from the tax authorities which, if successful, can eliminate the benefits and potentially lead to bad publicity.

 

In a bid to make Britain more attractive to multinational businesses, the UK government is changing the way in which foreign profits are taxed through reform of the Controlled Foreign Companies (CFC) regime.

 

Click here to view KPMG’s video on the UK CFC regime for the latest insights

 

Stuart McDougall

Stuart McDougall

Partner

KPMG in the UK

 

KPMG's 2013 Global Transfer Pricing Review, based on a survey by KPMG International member firms' transfer pricing practices, is designed to help multinational companies stay current with transfer pricing rules worldwide. The publication provides a wealth of local country transfer pricing information, including documentation requirements, deadlines, transfer pricing methods, penalties, special considerations, advance pricing agreement, and competent authority matters.

  

Click here to view and download the report or access relevant country specific information (Global link)

 

Philip Brook

Philip Brook

UK Head of M&A Tax

KPMG in the UK

 

Merger and acquisition (M&A) activity has mirrored the volatile and uncertain global economy.  The uncertainity from the European debt crisis and the lack of confidence in many large countries had a major impact on transactions; especially by limiting the traditional debt financing opportunities.  Transactions were often abandoned and, in many cases, only reached preliminary stages or were put on hold.  Targets are being thoroughly analyzed prior to investment decisions and only the most lucrative opportunities are being followed through.

 

Taxation of Cross-Border Mergers and Acquisitions features information from 60 countries on their current laws and regulations and the possible implications for tax-efficient structuring and financing of a merger acquisition.  Taxation of Cross-Border Mergers and Acquisitions can be used as a valuable tool to understand the tax impacts of transactions worlwide.

 

Click here to read and download the latest insights

 

Aman Wang

Aman Wang

Head of UK China Practice

KPMG in the UK

 

China might be one of the global economy’s last bright spots, but some multinationals are finding it harder than ever to compete in the country. Some foreign CEOs cite ‘Buy China’ or ‘indigenous innovation’ policies, among a list of concerns, as preventing foreign firms from fully tapping into China's robust growth and providing an advantage to local competitors.

 

However, economic nationalism is on the rise in most countries and governments across the world are raising regulatory barriers to foreign firms as a response to the global crisis.

 

Click to view and download the latest insights

 

 

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High Growth Markets video

 

Watch the compelling new KPMG film on High Growth Markets to gain further insight and hear from our clients and our people on what it takes to succeed in the exciting BRIC economies.