India

Environmental Sustainability 

Environmental sustainability is part of our Citizenship strategy. KPMG International launched the Global Green Initiative to tackle the challenges posed by climate change at a global level. KPMG in India is working towards a 15 per cent reduction in net emissions per Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) employee by 2015 from a 2010 baseline.

 

To help reduce our carbon footprint, we have introduced a number of energy saving solutions in our offices, across 10 cities. We also support solar and rainwater harvesting projects in residential areas, NGOs, schools and colleges in cities where we operate. We encourage our people to reduce their individual carbon footprint and be more environmentally responsible through initiatives like carpooling and video conferencing. Reiterating our commitment to the environment, we organised 30 tree planting drives across eight cities during which 6,500 saplings were planted.

Energy saving solutions at our offices

Energy saving solutions at our offices

Case study: Biodiversity park

Case study: Biodiversity park

The Biodiversity Park situated at the foot of the Aravali range was once a mining site. Since 2012, we have worked closely with the NGO iamgurgaon to achieve their goal of bringing together residents, companies, schools and NGOs in Gurgaon to look for sustainable solutions to environmental issues.

 

  • Pro bono projects
  • Sponsoring preservation of 150 indigenous flora thereby reducing water required to irrigate plants in the park
  • Supported the planting of over 5,000 saplings
  • 24,000 plants over 90 acres are irrigated through a drip irrigation project, estimated to save five million litres of water annually
  • Regular employee engagement initiatives organised, including tree planting drives, leaf composting and transplanting saplings in the nursery.

Drip irrigation project

In 2014, as part of our World Environment Day celebrations, we have supported a ‘Drip Irrigation’ project at the Biodiversity Park in Gurgaon. This project aims at increasing the efficiency of water management in an area of the Biodiversity Park, which will impact approximately 24,000 plants. Before this project, water for the plants was carried in 10 litre watering cans in a tanker through the park which led to a lot of wastage of resources. In addition, since the park is situated at the foot of the Aravali Mountains, the terrain is rocky and devoid of much soil which also posed a challenge. By helping water reach the roots of the plants directly through a ‘drip line’ network, it is currently estimated that we shall be helping save about 5 million litres annually.
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