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KPMG Maturity Matrix 

We have been providing answers to the nine different questions that are at the core of greater involvement of patients in the creation of value in their own healthcare.

While the actions that follow from each answer is important, it is important to bring these answers together into an overarching plan for greater patient involvement in their own healthcare. The following a maturity matrix for a healthcare organization describes how the answers to the nine key questions can grow together into an overall and coherent plan for transformation. Answering each question is not necessary. But answering them together will ensure that your organization has the opportunity to create much more patient-created value.

To assess the maturity of a healthcare organization, please answer the questions by clicking on the responses below.

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  • Work to create a new culture centered on the patient culture
  • Absolute focus on patient involvement and experience at all leadership level
  • Some focus on patient involvement and experience
  • Key principles for patient engagement enacted and communicated
  • Strong narrative about what good patient experience looks like
  • Recognition that there needs to be a narrative about patient experience and outcomes and some work carried out on it
  • No focus on patient involvement and outcomes
  • Patient input into service design
  • Sophisticated methods for understanding patient experience and preferences are in regular use
  • Patients involved in most service design
  • Patients beginning to be involved in some service design
  • Some pilots of patient involvement in service design
  • Recognition that patients should be involved in service design and some contact with patients to achieve this
  • Patients not involved in design at all
  • Systems to support shared decision-making
  • Patients are offered coaching, decision aids and other support to be involved in all decision-making. No decision about me without me
  • Routine advanced planning including escalation and end of life
  • Shared decision-making is standard
  • Some pilots for shared decision-making
  • Recognition that shared decision-making with patients produces better decisions and creates more value and the beginnings of a plan to implement that
  • No shared decision-making taking place
  • Models support self-care and help the professionals adapt
  • All medical staff are part of models of care that support self-care
  • Models of care are developed that are based upon a high level of measured patient activation with increasing patient social independence
  • Models of care are developed that need peer support networks and tools for self-management routinely available for patients
  • Some pilots that develop new models of healthcare that need retraining of medical staff to foreground improving patient care
  • Recognition that existing models of care may limit the ability of patients to self-manage and an exploration of the possibilities of different models
  • No recognition of the way in which existing models of healthcare limit the ability of patients to self-manage
  • Are patients assets mobilized?
  • Patients recognized as value creators by the organization and the Board, and their assets are invested in such
  • The Board systematically audits patients assets as potentially adding value to patients healthcare
  • Medical professionals lead the investment in patients assets across several care pathways
  • Some pilots which audit the patient assets that are available to add value to healthcare
  • Recognition that patients have assets that can contribute to healthcare value creation and that investment in those assets can gather returns
  • Patients are seen as lacking in assets to contribute to their own healthcare
  • Can patients get and use information?
  • All healthcare information available to the organization about individual patients is also available to those patients in a form that patients can understand
  • Several patient pathways are redeveloped based upon sharing patients' information with them
  • Medical staff recognize the need to provide patients with information about their condition and work with patients to find ways to translate that information
  • Some pilots where all the information about their condition is shared with patients in a form they can understand
  • Recognition that patients can use information about their healthcare to add value to healthcare and an analysis of different ways of doing this
  • No recognition that information should be available to patients
  • Are patients involved in teaching and research?
  • Patients involved in teaching all clinicians
  • Patient defined priorities and goal-based outcomes embedded in research processes
  • Training for patients to be involved in teaching and research
  • Pilots involving patients in some research and teaching
  • Recognition that patients should be involved in research and teaching and some plans to implement
  • No recognition of any patient role in teaching or research
  • Are the assets that communities can contribute mobilized?
  • Understanding across the organization with all medical pathways of how communities have resources that can add value to healthcare
  • The Board systematically audits community assets as potentially adding value to patient healthcare
  • Medical staff realize that communities can provide assets that can add value to healthcare and work with patients to find ways to realize that value
  • Some pilots which audit the community assets that are available to add value to healthcare
  • Recognition that the communities that patients live in could have assets to add to healthcare value and an analysis of different ways in which these assets could be realized
  • No idea that communities have assets that can add value to healthcare
  • Are there measurements systems to support this?
  • Patient experience and outcome data embedded in all performance management and governance
  • Patient experience and outcome data embedded in performance management of medical staff
  • Real-time collection data used at front line for improvement
  • Systematic collection of data reported to boards
  • Recognition that the collection of data on patient experience and outcomes will provide a basis for understanding progress in delivering healthcare outcomes and an analysis of different ways of doing this
  • No data on patient experience or outcome data collected

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'What Works' outlines how to improve care through better patient involvement and communities (PDF 2.28 MB).

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For additional information on KPMG healthcare services and professionals please contact your local team or email us at healthcare@kpmg.com.

What Works: Case studies

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