Global

Details

  • Service: Advisory, Management Consulting, Business Performance Services, IT Advisory Services
  • Industry: Healthcare, Government & Public Sector, Life Sciences
  • Type: Business and industry issue, Case study, White paper
  • Date: 12/19/2013

Design principles: Information, outcomes and engagement 

The following design principles for primary care encourage improved access to information and data-sharing, as well as the use of performance and outcome measures that are focused on the goals of patients for their care and wider life, rather than on more narrow biomedical indicators.
Single electronic record

There is a single electronic patient record that is accessible by relevant organizations and can be read and, perhaps in future added to, by the patient.


Many of the case studies in this report are using an electronic patient record but the real challenge is to link this to homecare providers, hospitals, ambulance services and other parts of the system.


Using middleware to link different systems together is one solution. Creating a single local system that meets the needs of all agencies is difficult.

Quality and outcomes

Primary care organizations make information about the quality and outcomes of care publicly available in real-time.


The Community Health Centre Botermarkt (Belgium) has embraced the use of performance and outcome measures that are focused on the goals of patients for their care and wider life, rather than on more narrow biomedical indicators.


Case in point: The Vitality Partnership has established an internal performance management framework that enables partners and staff to have real-time information on all statutory and contractual clinical and non-clinical indicators. These are being developed as indicators to share with commissioners.

Use community assets

The ability to link patients to wider social networks, to use health trainers and people not employed in the formal health service will be increasingly important. Many of the problems patients have are related to social isolation and factors not directly related to health services. Being able to direct patients to information about other services and to people who can help them use this is also important.

 

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